ROB DURSTON PHOTOGRAPHY

Posts Tagged ‘http://www.wonderfulmachine.com’

RyanAir CEO – Micheal O’Leary – Anatomy of a Shoot

Things have been ticking along quite nicely lately. We’ve been working pretty steadily and just completed a nice large project with NITB here in Northern Ireland. That mixed in with a few commercial clients and the odd editorial gig, has been keeping us on our toes.
So when I got a message from Barron’s in NYC, I got back to them as soon as I could, pronto like. Barron’s is a weekly out of the Dow Jones empire and its kind of the grinder when it comes to financials on a weekly basis instead of the super in depthness of the WSJ. Its much more hard hitting and cutting than Forbes and has the respect of many in the industry. It might not always be the most creative for photography but then those images aren’t there to represent that; they are there to tell a story albeit a quick one, usually just one image.
So I get the call, and who do you think they’d be looking for an image from in Ireland? Hmmmm, a CEO, someone who probably stands out etc etc….. Oh you know who . . .
Micheal O’Leary of RyanAir fame.
Well I think to myself, if there was ever a challenge, this would be it. You hear the rumours, the rumblings. . . short, sharp and sweet. I would have to go in with my game face on and never let it drop an inch.

The photo editor told me about the difficulties in booking the time with Micheal (he’s a very busy man) and that after three weeks of going back and forth they pinned down a date, a date I was available with so all good. I’ll have 45 minutes to set up and 15 minutes to spend shooting him. I knew a bit about him before but I did some more research and looked further into his career and life and came away impressed; smart man, makes money, no bullshit, no frills. . . . . . sounds familiar 😉 We arrive early hoping to get in and start setting up and working out a few ideas but to no luck, the executive board room we are booked in still has a meeting going on. Sure, no problem, we’ll wait and wait . . . . and wait. The meeting goes 15 minutes late and now we only have 30 minutes to haul all our gear in and truck it up to the second floor; its going to be a simple shadowless white seamless set up so we have a 9 foot and a square of plexi for under his feet. Steve, my assistant and I don’t even have the chance to pull out the light meter. We get it all roughed into this tiny 12×12 foot boardroom when the liaison tells us we can now open the dividing wall to get double the length out of the rooms, sweet. Now I don’t have to use the 17-40 on this poor guy.

The carpet in the middle is covering up all the A/V cables normally routed through the table. Plexi is there for a clean shadowless background.

RyanAir boardroom – a 12×12 foot room, see the 9 foot seamless. The carpet in the middle is covering up all the A/V cables normally routed through the table. Plexi is there for a clean shadowless background.

I throw the 70-200 on the body and with two lights on the white back ground and two lights on the subject, I pop off a couple of frames to see if we are in the ballpark. As I fire the third frame, in he walks. DAMN.

RyanAir boardroom – table top on the left and table legs on the right. Profoto Magnum on the right and silver softlight on the left, both running off Profoto 600B’s. Background is 2 Chimera strips, each powered by Acute 1200’s.

The first thing he says is, “this will not do”.
Uh oh, I better run for an interception here.
“Hi Mr O’Leary, I’m Rob Durston, and I understand I have 15 minutes of your time today”.
“Nope, you have five”.
Well that’s a nice introduction. From there it got even more complicated, in that our subject would “only” be photographed with a large model of one of his Boeing aircrafts.
5 minutes, silly model plane, unchecked lighting and the wild card himself, Micheal O’Leary.
Right from the first frame though he doesn’t lose a beat; every time the Profotos go off he changes his pose. Bang, bang, bang like a little pro model he just rhymes off various expressions and body positions. At around the 2 and a half minute mark I begin to plead with him for a few frames without the plane and a little more serious look; till this point, every frame he has put on a goofy face or silly smirk.
“Nope, nope, I won’t do it, this is what you’re getting. if I do a serious face that is the one that you and your editors will pick. No I will do what I want for this”.
Then through a couple of quick topic changes he asks me where I came from to do this shoot.
Without thinking (or maybe I was just a little subconsciously), I blurted out, “Toronto”. Its kinda true.
“Well in that case, I’ll let you use your stool as well”. I brought along a nice nondescript white stool to get him to sit on and sure enough he held onto that plane also. After a few more minutes he tells me, “okay you must have enough now”.
My first thought is to say no and push a little further but then I thought how much more is he going to give me and how much different will it be than what I already have? I keep talking, and scan through the images, exposures look okay and for the most part everything looks great. “Yup, you’re right Mr. O’Leary, we’re done here. I get him to sign a model release and bang. he’s gone.
Steve, my assistant, and I then sat down for a glass of water and a breather (the heat has been on the whole morning in the room and its close to 30 outside). I peered through the metadata; I was curious as to how many images we took and in how long.
We shot one hundred and twenty unique images in just under 4 minutes.
And here they are.

Here are three of my favourites.

Unretouched, this is my favourite image, serious and contemplating.

 

Micheal proudly holding a model of one of his 737s.

 

Micheal seated with his model 737, the RyanAir staple aircraft.

 

Many thanks to WonderfulMachine for consistently representing and marketing me.
Thanks guys


Wonderful Machine

 

Wonderful Machine

I have been “repped” by Wonderful Machine out of Philadelphia for about six months or so now and we just got our first project from them. It’s a decent little gig for a Canadian news publication. Should be cool.

Wonderful Machine is kind of a strange critter in the whole field of photographer sales agents/representatives.

On one hand you have the usual reps; the guys who walk into agencies and push your portfolio across creative/art directors/buyer’s desks. These are the people who sell you or another photographer they might rep to creatives in the industry by showing off the best aspects of you to the client and how you fit in with specific clients or project imaging needs. The big ones in photography are Stockland Martel, Art + Commerce, Art-Dept and Jed Root to name a few.

Then there are the small boutique agencies; the ones that really offer up the service that some of the big ones miss out on. A little more personal and inviting, they don’t have the huge artist power necessarily that the above ones might have but that doesn’t mean their artists aren’t as creative. Over the years I have circled around these ones; I have had the orientation meetings and come close to signing paper but they have never come to fruition. Sometimes they have pulled out (like the time another photographer barked that I was too similar to his style even though we shot totally different genres) or sometimes it has been myself who felt the timing wasn’t right or the deal itself was slanted one way. I do love these guys, you can ask them questions and have meeting and show off work to them and they are always honest and genuine. I hold no grudges or ills against any of them. On the contrary, I respect their word and judgements over almost anyone else in the industry. They are almost always on the front lines; building relationships on both sides of the desks, helping the artists hone their work to fit with market demands while finessing connections with the agencies and the creatives who are making the work that the artists are looking to do. Some examples of these are Marilyn Cadenbach, Christy Deddens at Deddens & Dedeens, Anne Desrochers at Klax-On-Nez, Kate Ryan at KateRyanInc and the wonderful Andrea Stern at Stern Rep.

At the other end of things are the Alt Picks, Black Book and Source Book options. they allow for a free listing in exchange for a limited number of images and info to be listing amongst hundreds if not thousands of other artists. You can pay for a membership to the sites that offer you more image and enhanced features; allowing you access to other members contact info etc. I personally never found the benefits of being stuck in the middle of students, amateurs and potentially any no talent ass clown with a camera. You get what you pay for and I don’t expect anything back from the sites, even though I am listed there; web presence everyone. I can see the benefit to being in there publications, there are still some art buyers and creatives who look through the books and actually research artists before embarking on a big project but at the thousands of dollars the pages in the books command, I see my hard earned earnings going towards more immediate and discernible marketing avenues. Some of the better examples of the work book type of publications/websites are WorkBook, Black Book, Le Book, AltPick and recent new comer Adbase’s Found Folios.

Now this is where Wonderful Machine sort of twists the standard rep model and turn it into something for the 21st century. They don’t take a percentage of my work, instead they charge me a monthly fee to promote my business to their list of potential clients; a list much larger than I could ever produce from all my contacts. They do this through direct contact (email and standard post mailers), website listing (their own site plus all of the other “source books” listed above), portfolio events for clients, ads in industry publications and many other ways. They also off me a consulting service. If I need help with a big quote, perhaps in a location I’m not familiar with, they can help and give me a more realistic quote that has a better potential to be accepted by the client. Another service I have taken advantage of already is their photo editing consulting. When I have needed to pare down a set of images beyond what I have felt comfortable with (you sometimes lose touch with the images, looking at them day in day out until they meld together into one big inseparable mass of colour and shapes). They have been able to look at them with no bias and come to a judgement on the images that I wouldn’t have been able to reach.

I have to hand it to the dozen or so staff at WM, they have done a great job for me so far, lets keep this ball rolling now.

R